Clinical Microbiology Made Ridiculously Simple

Clinical Microbiology Made Ridiculously Simple


Author:
Mark Gladwin, William Trattler & C. Scott Mahan
Published in: MedMaster, Inc.
Release Year: 2014
ISBN: 978-1-935660-15-6
Pages: 416
Edition: Sixth edition
File Size: 11 MB
File Type: pdf
Language: English



Description of Clinical Microbiology Made Ridiculously Simple


The practicing physician is critical for well Developed knowledge of clinical microbiology in any medical field. Bacteria, viruses, and protozoans have no respect for the distinction between ophthalmology, pediatrics, trauma surgery, or geriatric medicine. The concepts of microbial disease and antimicrobial therapy you will be faced daily if you have a physician. Microbiology is only one course where much of the minute is regularly used by the practicing physician.

The book Clinical Microbiology Made Ridiculously Simple is the learning of microbiology by presenting the information attempts to facilitate in a clear and entertaining manner brimming with memory aids. Our approach has been to:

1) A conversational style writing for rapid assimilation.

2) Include visual memory tools, numerous figures serving and summary charts at the end of each chapter. These can be used for "cram sessions" after the concepts have been studied in the text.

3) Clinical and infectious disease issues are more concentrating that are both interesting and vital to the actual practice of medicine.

4) An organized approach to the organisms studied so the student relies less on memory and more on logical pathophysiology.


The text has been updated to include current information on rapidly developing topics, such as HIV and AIDS (vaccine efforts and all the new anti-HIV medications), Avian Influenza H5Nl, SARS Coronavirus, Ebola virus, Hantavirus, E. coli outbreaks, Mad Cow Disease, brand-new antimicrobial antibiotics, and agents of bioterrorism


Content of Clinical Microbiology Made Ridiculously Simple



PART I BACTERIA  1
1 BACTERIAL TAXONOMY  1
2 CELL STRUCTURES, VIRULENCE FACTORS, and TOXINS  9
3 BACTERIAL GENETICS 21

GRAM-POSITIVE BACTERIA 21
4 STREPTOCOCCUS 27
5 STAPHYLOCOCCUS 40
6 BACILLUS and CLOSTRIDIUM (SPORE-FORMING RODS) 48
7 CORYNEBACTERIUM and LISTERIA (NON-SPORE-FORMING RODS)  58

GRAM-NEGATIVE BACTERIA  64
8 NEISSERIA 64
9 THE ENTERICS 72
10 HOSPITAL-ACQUIRED GRAM NEGATIVES  91
11 HAEMOPHILUS, BORDETELLA, and LEGIONELLA  96
12 YERSINIA, FRANCISELLA, BRUCELLA, and PASTEURELLA  104
13 CHLAMYDIA, RICKETTSIA, and FRIENDS  110
14 SPIROCHETES 128

ACID-FAST BACTERIA  142
15 MYCOBACTERIUM  142
BACTERIA WITHOUT CELL WALLS 156
16 MY CO PLASMA  156

ANTI-BACTERIAL MEDICATIONS  160
17 PENICILLIN FAMILY ANTIBIOTICS 160
18 ANTI-RIBOSOMAL ANTIBIOTICS  174
19 ANTI-TB and ANTI-LEPROSY ANTIBIOTICS 186
20 MISCELLANEOUS ANTIBIOTICS  194

PART 2 FUNGI  202
21 THE FUNGI  202
22 ANTI-FUNGAL MEDICATIONS  216

PART 3 VIRUSES  226
23 VIRAL REPLICATION and TAXONOMY  226
24 ORTHOMYXO and PARAMYXOVIRIDAE  240
25 HEPATITIS VIRIDAE  254
26 RETROVIRIDAE, HIV, and AIDS  266
27 HERPESVIRIDAE (contributing author: John Beigel, MD)  281
28 REST OF THE DNA VIRUSES  290
29 REST OF THE RNA VIRUSES (contributing authors: Amy Guillet Agrawal, MD and John Beige!, MD)  296
30 ANTI-VIRAL MEDICATIONS  314

PART 4 PARASITES 336
31 PROTOZOANS336
32 HELMINTHS 362

PART 5 VERY STRANGE CRITTERS  382
33 PRIONS (contributing author: Hans Henrik Larsen, MDJ 382

PART 6 THE END 387
34 ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE: ONE STEP TOWARD THE POST-ANTIBIOTIC ERA?
(contributing author: Earnest Alexander, PharmD l  387
35 THE AGENTS OF BIOTERRORISM
(contributing authors: Luciana Borio, MD and Clarence Lam)  392

INDEX399
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