The Epidemiology of Plant Diseases (PDF)

The Epidemiology of Plant Diseases
 
Author:
B.M. Cooke, D. Gareth Jones & B. Kaye
Release at: 2006
Pages: 584
Edition:
2nd Edition
File Size: 7 MB
File Type: pdf
Language: English


Description of The Epidemiology of Plant Diseases


The Epidemiology of Plant Diseases by 2nd Edition written by B.M. Cooke for plant pathology study available in (PDF/) to get a free download. Since the first edition of this book was published in 1998 by Kluwer Academic Publishers, I have been inspired to produce a second edition of the text but in a format that would make it much more affordable to senior research & research worker students working and studying in plant disease epidemiology. The inspiration for the first edition came solely from the volume around the time of his retirement by D. G. Jones from the Aberystwyth, the University of Wales, where I studied for both degrees in the Department of Agricultural Botany, & whereas an undergraduate was taught almost everything about plant pathology, and carried out the epidemiology postgraduate research of Septoria diseases of wheat, under the supervision of DGJ. This research was the first attempt to evaluate the importance of the two diseases under UK conditions, and work was greatly inspired by the late Ellis Griffiths.

DGJ agreed late in 2003 that a second edition of the book should be put in train, so reducing the cost compared to the first edition published in hardbound only. The Epidemiology of Plant Diseases book publication by Springer, dealing with this publisher made the task easier, as being the Editor in Chief of the European Journal of Plant Pathology, I had already established the necessary publishing contacts within the organization in Dordrecht, The Netherlands Zuzana Bernhart and Ineke Ravesloot who have been most helpful at all times.

The next task was to revise their chapter contributions and persuade in the light of the rapid modern developments in plant disease epidemiology that have occurred since the 1st edition was published and named its molecular diagnostics and information technology. I need not have worried. The response has been truly amazing. Although this 2nd edition follows largely the pattern of the first, all chapters have been updated by the original authors, & significant contributions added by new authors who are at the cutting edge of their respective fields. Again the text is divided into two parts: Principles, Methods, & Case Examples. The result is a comprehensive text on all aspects of the epidemiology of plant diseases that should serve as an invaluable reference work for those involved in this fascinating and dynamic science of crop plants.

Content of The Epidemiology of Plant Diseases



Part One: Principles and Methods

1  Plant disease diagnosis  1
R.T.V. Fox and H.P. Narra
1.1 Introduction  1
1.2 Choice of diagnostic  3
1.3 Diagnosis by conventional techniques  4
1.4 Use of immunological reactions  7
1.5 Methods based on the nucleic acids of pathogens  15
1.6 Future trends in diagnosis  28
References  32

2  Disease assessment and yield loss  43
B.M. Cooke
2.1 Introduction  43
2.2 Why assess disease & yield loss in plants?  44
2.3 Methods used in sampling plants for disease  44
2.4 Timing and frequency of disease assessment  46
2.5 Methods of disease assessment  51
2.6 Assessment of yield loss  67
2.7 Conclusions and future developments  73
References  75

3  Surveys of variation in virulence and fungicide resistance and their application to disease control  81
James K.M. Brown
3.1 Introduction  81
3.2 Characterising individual pathogens  81
3.3 Populations and samples  88
3.4 Molecular detection of virulence and fungicide resistance  91
3.5 Characterising pathogen populations  96
3.6 Applications of pathogen survey data  100
3.7 Dissemination of survey results  107
3.8 Pathogen surveys and disease management  109
Acknowledgement  109
References  110

4  Infection strategies of plant-parasitic fungi  117
C. Struck
4.1 Introduction  117
4.2 The pre-penetration phase  118
4.3 Entering the plant tissue  120
4.4 Strategies for colonizing the host tissue  126
4.5 Concluding remarks  131
References  131

5  Epidemiological consequences of plant disease resistance  139
M.L. Deadman
5.1 Introduction  139
5.2 Horizontal resistance  140
5.3 Vertical resistance  145
5.4 Cultivar mixtures  148
5.5 Induced resistance  150
5.6 Non-host immunity  153
5.7 Tolerance  153
References  156

6  Dispersal of foliar plant pathogens: mechanisms, gradients and spatial patterns  159
H.A. McCartney, B.D.L. Fitt and J.S. West
6.1 Introduction  159
6.2 Underlying mechanisms: spore dispersal  160
6.3 Spore deposition and disease gradients  174
6.4 Disease spread: modelling development of foci  180
6.5 Conclusions  185
Acknowledgements  185
References  186

7  Pathogen population dynamics  193
M.W. Shaw
7.1 Introduction  193
7.2 The measurement of populations  193
7.3 Time-scales  195
7.4 Changes in populations  196
7.5 Density-dependent and density-independent factors  197
7.6 Short-term change in a static host population  197
7.7 Affected host tissue and pathogen multiply at comparable rates  201
7.8 Changes over time-scales longer than either crop or pathogen lifetime  202
7.9 Spatial population structure  208
Appendix 7A  211
References  211

8  Modelling and interpreting disease progress in time  215
Xiangming Xu
8.1 Introduction  215
8.2 General considerations  216
8.3 Analysing individual epidemics  217
8.4 Reducing data dimension  226
8.5 Comparing epidemics  229
8.6 Concluding remarks  235
References  235

9  Disease forecasting  239
N.V. Hardwick
9.1 Introduction  239
9.2 What is forecasting?  240
9.3 Polycyclic and monocyclic diseases  242
9.4 Equipment  242
9.5 Forecasting schemes  243
9.6 Potatoes  244
9.7 Cereals  251
9.8 Oilseed rape  258
9.9 Conclusions  260
References  264

10  Diversification strategies  269
Maria R. Finckh and Martin S. Wolfe
10.1 Introduction  269
10.2 Definitions  271
10.3 Benefits from spacial diversification: small-scale  273
10.4 Benefits of diversification in time (crop rotation)  285
10.5 Diversity and interactions  287
10.6 Responses of pest and pathogen populations to diversification strategies  288
10.7 Diversification strategies in practice  293
10.8 Conclusions  296
References  297

11  Epidemiology in sustainable systems  309
R.J. Cook and D.J. Yarham
11.1 Introduction  309
11.2 Inoculum  310
11.3 Disease development  319
11.4 Control strategies  324
11.5 Conclusions  330
Acknowledgement  331
References  332

12  Information technology in plant disease epidemiology  335
Adrian Newton, Neil McRoberts and Gareth Hughes
12.1 Introduction  335
12.2 Definition of IT in plant disease epidemiology 336
12.3 The world according to ‘Google’  337
12.4 Real-world data capture  339
12.5 Information accumulation or dissemination?  340
12.6 Bringing together disciplines  342
12.7 Models, expert systems and decision support systems  343
12.8 Some examples of DSS  345
12.9 Disease forecasting & decision making in an information theory framework  346
12.10 Where next?  354
12.11 Conclusions  355
Acknowledgements  355
References  356

Part Two: Case Examples

13  Seedborne diseases  357
W.J. Rennie and Valerie Cockerell
13.1 Introduction  357
13.2 Epidemiology  358
13.3 Case studies  361
13.4 Future developments  368
References  369

14  Diseases caused by soil-borne pathogens  373
P. Lucas
14.1 Introduction  373
14.2 The soil-borne disease epidemic  374
14.3 Modelling soil-borne disease epidemiology  379
14.4 Conclusion  384
References  384

15  Wind-dispersed diseases  387
B. Hau and C. de Vallavieille-Pope
15.1 Introduction  387
15.2 Meteorological and biotic effects on the phases of the asexual life cycle  388
15.3 Survival and sexual state  402
15.4 Population dynamics  404
15.5 Concluding remarks  406
References  408

16  Environmental biophysics applied to the dispersal of fungal spores by rain-splash  417
L. Huber, L. Madden and B.D.L. Fitt
16.1 Introduction  417
16.2 Removal of spores by splash of single incident drops  417
16.3 From a single impacting raindrop to splash droplets  419
16.4 Influence of target characteristics on splash parameters  425
16.5 Relevant characteristics of rainfall-canopy interactions  430
16.6 Characterizing rainfall in relation to splash-dispersed pathogen diseases  435
16.7 Concluding remarks  439
References  441

17  Potato late blight  445
Eduardo S.G. Mizubuti and William E. Fry
17.1 Introduction  445
17.2 Population biology of P. infestans  446
17.3 Pathogen biology  450
17.4 Late blight management  457
17.5 Concluding remarks  464
References  465

18  Apple scab: role of environment in pathogen and epidemic development  473
A.L. Jones and G.W. Sundin
18.1 Introduction  473
18.2 Aetiology of apple scab  473
18.3 Predicting apple scab risk based on the physical environment  475
18.4 Predicting apple scab risk based on primary inoculum levels  481
18.5 Summary  485
Acknowledgement  486
References  486

19  Onion diseases  491
R.B. Maude
19.1 Introduction: world onions  491
19.2 Onion diseases  493
19.3 Case histories: seed-borne diseases  493
19.4 Case histories: foliar diseases  497
19.5 Case histories: soilborne diseases  506
19.6 Concluding remarks  512
Acknowledgements  513
References  513

20  The recent epidemic of cassava mosaic virus disease in Uganda  521
G.W. Otim-Nape and J.M. Thresh
20.1 Introduction  521
20.2 Cassava and cassava mosaic disease in Africa  522
20.3 Cassava and cassava mosaic disease in Uganda  525
20.4 The 1990s epidemic in Uganda  526
20.5 General epidemiological features of cassava mosaic disease  544
References  546


Index  551
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