The Insects Structure and Function (PDF)

The Insects Structure and Function
 
Author:
R. F. Chapman, Stephen J. Simpson & 
Angela E. Douglas
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN No: 978-0-521-11389-2
Release at: 2013
Pages: 961
Edition:
5th Edition
File Size: 6 MB
File Type: pdf
Language: English



Description of The Insects Structure and Function 5th Edition


The Insects Structure and Function 5th edition is a great book written by Chapman use for Entomology study to get free pdf download. The Insects Structure and Function 5th edition have been the standard textbook in the field since the first edition was published over 40 years ago. Building on the strengths of Chapman’s original text, this long-awaited new edition has been revised and expanded by a team of eminent insect physiologists, bringing it fully up to date for the molecular era. The chapters retain the successful structure of the earlier editions, focusing on particular functional systems rather than on taxonomic groups and making it easy for students to delve into topics without extensive knowledge of taxonomy

The focus is on form and function, bringing together basic anatomy and physiology and examining how these relate to behavior. This, combined with nearly 600 clear illustrations and give a comprehensive understanding of how insects work. Now also featuring a richly illustrated prologue by G. Mc Gavin, this book The Insects Structure and Function 5th edition is an essential text for students, researchers and applied entomologists alike.

R. F. Chapman was a Professor in the Division of Neurobiology and an eminent insect physiologist at the University of Arizona. His first four editions of The Insects have formed the standard text in the field for more than 40 years.

Stephen J. Simpson is an ARC Laureate Fellow in the School of Biological Sciences and Academic Director of the Perkins Centre for the study of obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease at the University of Sydney. His core research aims are to understand swarming in locusts and to develop and implement an integrative framework for studying nutrition. In 2012 he was awarded the Wigglesworth Medal from the Royal Entomological Society of London.

Angela E. Douglas and Elaine Sarkaria are Toxicology and Professor of Insect Physiology at Cornell University, New York. Her research and teaching are motivated by the mechanisms underlying insect function, and her core research interests are the overlapping topics of insect nutrition and interactions between insects and beneficial microorganisms. She is a Fellow of The Royal Entomological Society and The Entomological Society of America.

Content of The Insects Structure and Function 5th Edition



Part I The head, ingestion, distribution and utilization of food


1 Head. 3

Introduction. 3

1.1 Head. 4

1.2 Neck. 9

1.3 Antennae. 10

Summary. 13


2 Mouthparts and feeding. 15

Introduction. 15

2.1 Ectognathous mouthparts. 16

2.2 Mechanics and control of feeding. 22

2.3 Regulation of feeding. 34

2.4 Other consequences of feeding. 37

2.5 Head glands. 37

Summary. 43


3 Alimentary canal, digestion, and absorption. 46

Introduction. 46

3.1 The alimentary canal. 47

3.2 Digestion. 59

3.3 Absorption. 72

3.4 The alimentary tract as an immunological organ. 77

Summary. 78


4 Nutrition. 81

Introduction. 81

4.1 Required nutrients. 82

4.2 Balance of nutrients. 87

4.3 Nutritional effects on growth, development, reproduction, and lifespan. 95

4.4 Contribution of symbiotic microorganisms to insect nutrition. 98

Summary. 104


5 Circulatory system, blood, and the immune system. 107

Introduction. 107

5.1 The circulatory system. 108

5.2 Circulation. 113

5.3 Hemolymph. 117

5.4 Hemocytes. 124

Summary. 129

6 Fat body. 132

Introduction. 132

6.1 Fat body structure and development. 133

6.2 Storage and utilization of nutrients and energy. 137

6.3 Function as an endocrine organ and nutritional sensor. 142

Summary. 144


Part II The thorax and locomotion 


7 Thorax. 149

Introduction. 149

7.1 Segmentation of the thorax. 150

7.2 Morphology of the thorax. 151

7.3 Muscles of the thorax. 155

Summary. 155


8 Legs and locomotion. 157

Introduction. 157

8.1 Structure of the legs. 158

8.2 Walking and running. 166

8.3 Other mechanisms of terrestrial locomotion. 173

8.4 Aquatic locomotion. 180

8.5 Other uses of legs. 186

Summary. 189


9 Wings and flight. 193

Introduction. 193

9.1 Structure of the wings. 194

9.2 Form of the wings. 204

9.3 Movement of the wings. 207

9.4 Wing kinematics. 214

9.5 Aerodynamic mechanisms. 221

9.6 Power for flight. 223

9.7 Sensory systems for flight control. 225

Summary. 230


10 Muscles. 233

Introduction. 233

10.1 Structure. 234

10.2 Muscle contraction. 242

10.3 Regulation of muscle contraction. 244

10.4 Energetics of muscle contraction. 252

10.5 Muscular control in the intact insect. 254

10.6 Changes during development. 257

Summary. 263


Part III The abdomen, reproduction and development


11 Abdomen. 269

Introduction. 269

11.1 Segmentation. 270

11.2 Abdominal appendages and outgrowths. 273

Summary. 280


12 Reproductive system: male. 282

Introduction. 282

12.1 Anatomy of the internal reproductive organs. 283

12.2 Spermatozoa. 286

12.3 Transfer of sperm to the female. 292

12.4 Other effects of mating. 306

Summary. 310


13 Reproductive system: female. 313

Introduction. 313

13.1 Anatomy of the internal reproductive organs. 314

13.2 Oogenesis. 317

13.3 Ovulation. 333

13.4 Fertilization of the egg. 333

13.5 Oviposition. 335

Summary. 343


14 The egg and embryology. 347

Introduction. 347

14.1 The egg. 348

14.2 Embryogenesis. 357

14.3 Alternative strategies of acquiring nutrients by embryos. 379

14.4 Sex determination. 388

14.5 Parthenogenesis. 390

14.6 Pedogenesis. 392

Summary. 393


15 Postembryonic development. 398

Introduction. 398

15.1 Hatching. 399

15.2 Larval development. 403

15.3 Metamorphosis. 417

15.4 Control of postembryonic development. 436

15.5 Polyphenism. 443

15.6 Diapause. 448

Summary. 454


Part IV The integument, gas exchange and homeostasis


16 Integument. 463

Introduction. 463

16.1 Epidermis. 464

16.2 The cuticle. 469

16.3 Chemical composition of the cuticle. 473

16.4 Types of cuticles. 483

16.5 Molting. 488

16.6 Cuticle formation. 493

16.7 Functions of the integument. 497

Summary. 498


17 Gaseous exchange. 501

Introduction. 501

17.1 Tracheal system. 502

17.2 Spiracles. 511

17.3 Cutaneous gas exchange. 515

17.4 Respiratory pigments. 515

17.5 Gaseous exchange in terrestrial insects. 516

17.6 Gaseous exchange in aquatic insects. 528

17.7 Insects subject to occasional submersion. 537

17.8 Gas exchange in endoparasitic insects. 540

17.9 Other functions of the tracheal system. 541

17.10 Gas exchange in insect eggs. 542

Summary. 542


18 Excretion and salt and water regulation. 546

Introduction. 546

18.1 Excretory system. 547

18.2 Urine production. 552

18.3 Modification of the primary urine. 555

18.4 Control of diuresis. 559

18.5 Nitrogenous excretion. 562

18.6 Detoxification. 567

18.7 Non-excretory functions of the Malpighian tubules. 569

18.8 Nephrocytes. 571

18.9 Water regulation. 573

Summary. 584


19 Thermal relations. 588

Introduction. 588

19.1 Body temperature. 589

19.2 Thermoregulation. 595

19.3 Performance curves. 598

19.4 Behavior and survival at low temperatures. 600

19.5 Activity and survival at high temperatures. 607

19.6 Acclimation. 610

19.7 Cryptobiosis. 611

19.8 Temperature and humidity receptors. 611

19.9 Temperature-related changes in the nervous system. 614

19.10 Large-scale patterns in insect thermal biology. 616

Summary. 617


Part V Communication A Physiological coordination within the insect


20 Nervous system. 625

Introduction. 625

20.1 Basic components. 626

20.2 Basic functioning. 630

20.3 Anatomy of the nervous system. 642

20.4 Brain. 647

20.5 Controlling behavior. 659

Summary. 669


21 Endocrine system. 674

Introduction. 674

21.1 Chemical structure of hormones. 675

21.2 Endocrine organs. 684

21.3 Transport of hormones. 691

21.4 Regulation of hormone titer. 691

21.5 Mode of action of hormones. 696

Summary. 703


B Perception of the environment


22 Vision. 708

Introduction. 708

22.1 Compound eyes. 709

22.2 Form and motion vision. 715

22.3 Receptor physiology, color and polarization vision. 721

22.4 Dorsal ocelli. 731

22.5 Stemmata. 732

22.6 Other visual receptors. 734

22.7 Magnetic sensitivity and photoreception. 735

Summary. 735


23 Mechanoreception. 738

Introduction. 738

23.1 Cuticular mechanoreceptors. 739

23.2 Chordotonal organs. 748

23.3 Stretch and tension receptors. 764

Summary. 768


24 Chemoreception. 771

Introduction. 771

24.1 External structure of chemosensory sense organs. 772

24.2 Cellular components. 774

24.3 Distribution and numbers of sensory sensilla. 776

24.4 How the chemosensory sensillum functions. 776

24.5 Integrating function and behavior. 788

24.6 Projections to the central nervous system. 789

Summary. 791


C Communication with other organisms


25 Visual signals: color and light production. 793

Introduction. 793

25.1 The nature of color. 795

25.2 Structural colors. 795

25.3 Pigmentary colors. 802

25.4 Color patterns. 807

25.5 Color change. 807

25.6 Significance of color. 813

25.7 Light production. 817

Summary. 821


26 Mechanical communication: producing sound and substrate vibrations. 824

Introduction. 824

26.1 Nature and transmission of acoustic and vibrational signals. 825

26.2 Significance of acoustic and vibrational signals. 826

26.3 Mechanisms producing sounds and vibrations. 832

26.4 Patterns of acoustic and vibrational signals. 845

26.5 Neural regulation of sound production. 847

Summary. 853


27 Chemical communication: pheromones and allelochemicals. 857

Introduction. 857

27.1 Defining chemical signals. 858

27.2 Pheromones used in intraspecific communication. 858

27.3 Information content of pheromonal signals. 874

27.4 Biosynthesis of pheromones. 876

27.5 Regulation of pheromone production. 882

27.6 Perception of pheromones and other info chemicals. 883

27.7 Information transfer between species: allelochemicals. 885

27.8 Producing, storing and releasing allomones. 887

27.9 Allelochemicals used in defense. 890

27.10 Mimicry. 895

Summary. 898


Index. 901

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